Comparative rhetorical analysis essay example

"Setting refers to the time and place of a speech act and, in general, to the physical circumstances" - [13] The living room in the grandparents' home might be a setting for a family story. Scene is the "psychological setting" or "cultural definition" of a setting, including characteristics such as range of formality and sense of play or seriousness. [14] The family story may be told at a reunion celebrating the grandparents' anniversary. At times, the family would be festive and playful; at other times, serious and commemorative.

PRIMARY SOURCES

LITERARY NARRATIVE

— Dreiser: An American Tragedy (`25)
— Lewis: Elmer Gantry (`27)
— Steinbeck: The Grapes of Wrath (`39)
— Stein: Three Lives (`09)
— Hemingway: In Our Time(`25), The Sun Also Rises (`26), For Whom the Bell Tolls (`40)
— Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby (`25), Tender Is the Night (`34), The Last Tycoon (`41), The Pat Hobby Stories (`39-`41)
— Faulkner: The Sound and the Fury (`29), Absalom, Absalom! (`36), Light in August (`32)
— Barnes: Nightwood (`37)
— West: The Day of the Locust (`39)
— Wright: Native Son (`40)
— Ellison: Invisible Man (`47)
— Baldwin: Giovanni's Room (`56)
— Kerouac: On the Road (`55), The Subterraneans (`58)
— Mailer: Deer Park (`55)
— Burroughs: Naked Lunch (`59)
— Hawkes: The Cannibal (`62)
— Flannery O' Connor: Wiseblood (`52), "A Good Man is Hard to Find"(`53), "The Lame Shall Enter First"(`62)
— Nabokov: Pale Fire (`62)
— Pynchon: The Crying of Lot 49 (`66)
— DeLillo: White Noise (`85)

GENRE FILMS

HORROR
— Whale: The Bride of Frankenstein (`35)
— Tourneur: I Walked with a Zombie (`43)
— Siegel: The Invasion of the Body Snatchers (`56)
— Hitchcock: Psycho (`60)
— Polanski: Rosemary's Baby (`68)
— Romero: Dawn of the Dead (`78)

WESTERN
— Hawks: Red River (`48)
— Stevens: Shane (`53)
— Ford: The Searchers (`56)
— Ray: Johnny Guitar (`54)
— Peckinpah: The Wild Bunch (`69)

DOMESTIC MELODRAMA
— Griffith: Way Down East (`20)
— Vidor: Stella Dallas (`37)
— Rapper: Now Voyager (`42)
— Johnson: Peyton Place (`57)
— Sirk: Written on the Wind (`57)

FILM NOIR
— Wilder: Double Indemnity (`44)
— Siodmark: The Killers (`45)
— Dassin: Night and the City (`50)
— Aldrich: Kiss Me Deadly (`55)
— Laughton: Night of the Hunter (`55)
— Pakula: Klute (`71)

MOVIES ABOUT HOLLYWOOD
— Fleming: Bombshell (`33)
— Ray: In a Lonely Place (`50)
— Wilder: Sunset Boulevard (`50)
— Minelli: The Bad and the Beautiful (`52)
— Donen: Singin' in the Rain (`52)
— Cukor: A Star is Born (`54)

For "Movies about Hollywood," related literary texts:
The Day of the Locust; The Last Tycoon; The Pat Hobby Stories; Deer Park; I Should Have Stayed Home. Also, from Crime/Noir Fiction List, cross reference: Chandler's The Little Sister and McCoy's They Shoot Horses, Don't They?

Comparative rhetorical analysis essay example

comparative rhetorical analysis essay example

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